Mount Isa Indigenous community observes nine year milestone since Kevin Rudd's apology to stolen generation

IN ATTENDANCE: Peter Smith and Cyril Butcher attend the ceremony to recognise nine years since Kevin Rudd's apology to the stolen generation. Photo: Chris Burns.

IN ATTENDANCE: Peter Smith and Cyril Butcher attend the ceremony to recognise nine years since Kevin Rudd's apology to the stolen generation. Photo: Chris Burns.

LOCAL Indigenous community representatives attended the Mount Isa Island Bowls Club to recognise nine years since prime minister Kevin Rudd apologised to the stolen generation. 

Kalkadoon Community chair Virginia Mayo reflected on the apology by saying it provided some closure for families affected by the federal government’s forced removal policy. "But it’s not enough,” she said. 

Mona Phillips and Sharn Forgarty, from Injilinji Youth Services.

Mona Phillips and Sharn Forgarty, from Injilinji Youth Services.

Vietnam veteran Peter Smith recalled the time of the apology to be “ a very emotional day”. 

“I was really moved by what he (Mr Rudd) had to say because it was not what myself had gone through but what my mum had gone through.” 

Dorothy Albert and Evelyn Neade at the event held at the Mount Isa Island Bowls Club.

Dorothy Albert and Evelyn Neade at the event held at the Mount Isa Island Bowls Club.

She was born and raised in Kamilario country, but removed from a cattle station in NSW to work as a servant. She lost contact with family.

In 1979, by “divine intervention” Mr Smith found an aunt while he worked as a ranger. 

A cake cutting ceremony was held at the ceremony. Attendees also watched a recording of Mr Rudd’s speech. 

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