Brett Carlsson promoted to senior role in Queensland wild dog management

A three-pronged revamp of wild dog management in Queensland has put strategies for control in the northern part of the state firmly in the spotlight.

BIG TERRITORY: Brett Carlsson, based in Cairns, has been appointed senior wild dog coordinator for north and north west Queensland.

BIG TERRITORY: Brett Carlsson, based in Cairns, has been appointed senior wild dog coordinator for north and north west Queensland.

Brett Carlsson, a veteran of pest control programs as AgForce’s wild dog coordinator for 13 years, has been appointed the senior wild dog coordinator for north and north western Queensland under a new project co-funded by Meat & Livestock Australia, the state government’s Agriculture Department, AgForce, Australian Wool Innovation, and regional local government bodies.

Brett will continue to be based in Cairns and as well as helping producers from the coast across to the Northern Territory border reduce the impact of wild dogs, he will oversee the activities of two additional wild dog coordinators in central and south west parts of the state.

Skyela Kruger, the new south west wild dog coordinator, based in St George.

Skyela Kruger, the new south west wild dog coordinator, based in St George.

According to MLA’s general manager for producer consultation and adoption, Michael Crowley, growth in wild dogs were increasingly affecting cattle producers in the north.

“Producers in the northern region may not be aware of recent developments in best practice pest control and planning,” he said.

Rohan Dent is the central west wild dog coordinator, based in Blackall and servicing the seven shires in the Remote Area Planning and Development Board region.

Rohan Dent is the central west wild dog coordinator, based in Blackall and servicing the seven shires in the Remote Area Planning and Development Board region.

“These newly funded positions aim to engage producers in best practice control strategies, train them in the use of the most up-to-date tools, encourage adoption of the latest technologies and facilitate the coordination of control programs.

“Data collected through the program will also be valuable in evaluating the extent of the wild dog problem in Queensland.”

Brett said the new structure would provide support to landholders to undertake a coordinated approach. 

“A lot of wild dog control is happening in the cattle industry but it could be better coordinated to ensure producers are working in groups, sharing the load and having a greater impact on wild dog populations,” he said.

“Calves are obviously at risk from dog attacks, but reducing dog numbers will result in less cattle with bite marks and other injuries, and less stress to livestock, particularly calving heifers.