Mount Isa and District flag raising ceremony celebrates the history, culture and achievements of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

THE PERFORMERS: The dancers encouraged the crowd to come up and try some of their moves. Photos: Melissa North
THE PERFORMERS: The dancers encouraged the crowd to come up and try some of their moves. Photos: Melissa North

The theme for this year’s Naidoc week is ‘Because of her we can’. It is to celebrate the great work our women do at home, within the community and on a broader level.

Naidoc week kicked off to a crowd of Indigenous community members, the Mount Isa Police Liaison Officers, Emergency Services and the public as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags were raised and blew in the breeze at the Police Headquarters on Monday.

Queensland Police Superintendent Glen Pointing said the Mount Isa and District flag raising ceremony dates back to 2010. It’s an established QPS tradition now, to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Superintendent Glen Pointing addressed the crowd while Senior Police Liaison Officer Barbara Costello waited to raise the Aboriginal flag.

Superintendent Glen Pointing addressed the crowd while Senior Police Liaison Officer Barbara Costello waited to raise the Aboriginal flag.

“This ceremony symbolises our working with Aboriginal people through services, programs and initiatives,” he said.

“The QPS is committed to breaking down barriers and misconceptions.”

Superintendent Pointing paid tribute to the community members and service providers who have worked with the QPS.

The Aboriginal flag was raised by Senior Police Liaison Officer Barbara Costello and the Torres Strait Islander flag was raised by Senior Police Liaison Officer Rachael Ambrun.

The celebrations continued with a morning tea held at Police Headquarters.

Across town at Mini Davis Park in Sunset, a Family Fun Day was held.

Plenty of games stalls kept the younger children amused while the Aboriginal Dance group performed for the crowd.

Bulldust entertained throughout the day with classic rock songs and ballads.

The origins of Naidoc began to gather pace in the 1920s and 30s which resulted in the establishment of Aboriginal Sunday in the 40s.

In 1957 a National Aborigines Day Observance Committee was formed. The federal and State Governments supported and cooperated churches and many major Indigenous organisations.

The aim of NADOC was to promote Aboriginal Sunday as a day of community celebrations of the nation’s Aboriginal people.

It wasn’t until 1988 that the NADOC committee changed it’s name to – National Aborigines and Islanders Observance Day Committee.