Alexis Wright talked about her novels and what they meant to her

LIVE STREAM: Alexis Wright spoke about her writing and what her novels mean to her. Photo: Sabina Knight
LIVE STREAM: Alexis Wright spoke about her writing and what her novels mean to her. Photo: Sabina Knight

Alexis Wright is a Waanyi woman hailing from Cloncurry who recently won the 2018 sixth annual Stella prize for writing by an Australian women.

Wright was recognised for her latest compilation – a collective memoir – called Tracker and a live stream interview was aired from JCU Townsville to the Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health on Tuesday evening.

She discussed her writing and the global messages within each of her publications.

“Winning the Stella prize was a great honour,” Wright said.

The novel, Tracker, was released in 2017 and details of the life of Leigh Bruce "Tracker" Tilmouth were compiled in interviews, anecdotes and testimony from those who knew him best.

“He’s an important person in the Aboriginal world.”

Before Tracker, Wright published two other works of non-fiction.

Take Power is an anthology that takes you on an inside glimpse of the Central Land Council to reveal political battles, the legal manoeuvres and the fight for land rights in Central Australia

Grog War is a study of alcohol abuse in the Northern Territory town of Tennant Creek.

Wright is the author of prize-winning novels Carpentaria and The Swan Book. 

In 2007 she won the Miles Franklin Award for Carpentaria.

Her books have been published widely overseas in China, US, UK, Italy, France and Poland.

Wright’s achievements are momentous as she was recently named the Boisbouvier Chair in Australian Literature at the University of Melbourne and she is the only Author to win both the Miles Franklin Award and the Stella Prize.